Retraining Options for the Recently Redundant

Once you have been made redundant in your job role, it may seem natural to search for a new job with similar responsibilities. However, this could be a great opportunity to consider your values in life and re-evaluate whether you would like to continue with this profession.

Did you know that currently 3.8 people per 1,000 employees are made redundant or take voluntary redundancy? If you’re one of those 3.8, you may find comfort to know you’re not alone in this. Furthermore, because redundancy is such a common occurrence, there’s a variety of retraining options available to get you back into the job market as soon as possible.

Once you have been made redundant in your job role, it may seem natural to search for a new job with similar responsibilities. However, this could be a great opportunity to consider your values in life and re-evaluate whether you would like to continue with this profession. Here are a few things to consider:

  • Is there a job you always wanted to do but you ended up in another?
  • Are there other trades you would like to learn?
  • Would you like a qualification to back up your previous experience?

If you answer, “Yes,” to any of theses questions, now is the time to consider retraining.

Reasons to Retrain

Retraining can provide you with a new lease on life. If you’ve been made redundant, it is common to feel deflated, lost, or even depressed. Redundancy often is seen as similar to the grieving process and can cause severe psychological distress. Retraining will provide you with a new purpose in life and will stand you in better stead when it comes to applying for another job.

Additionally, many jobs will also provide a payout when it comes to redundancy. Even if this is a small amount, it can easily pay for a retraining course in any field you choose. Many training facilities will provide a range of different courses, so there will always be something to suit you.

Different Methods of Retraining

There are plenty of different options when it comes to retraining after redundancy. Here’s a brief look at the different steps you can take to retrain.

1. University: When it comes to learning a new skill, many people’s first thought is to attend a university. The main benefit of a university is that it provides you with a higher-education degree, which is a big advantage when applying for a new job.

However, a university can be expensive and it can take up to four years to retrain. If you do not have the funds and time, there are cheaper options available. Some universities allow you to work remotely and will be flexible around your schedule, so it’s best to research all options when choosing this retraining route.

2. Apprenticeships: Apprenticeships are not just for younger people. You may be surprised to learn that in 2014/2015, more than 55,700 people starting an apprenticeship were aged 45 to 59. There’s no age limit for apprenticeships, and you may even find the government can help you retrain through adult apprenticeship courses.

Adult apprenticeships typically mean you spend half your time in the job role and the other half training, which typically can take a couple of years to complete. This is a good option for those who learn best by doing. The only downside to retraining through an apprenticeship is that the pay may not be anywhere near what you’re use to. Many apprenticeships pay less because they are paying to train you at the same time.

3. Training Courses: Another popular retraining option after redundancy is a training course. This method of retraining typically will be shorter than gaining a degree or completing an apprenticeship. Some companies will even help you learn an entirely new skill in a matter of weeks. This is an alluring option for those looking to get straight back out into the world of work.

Training courses in the trade industry as especially popular as they can help teach you a lifelong skill and you will earn a qualification. Learning to become an electrician or plumber, for example, will provide you with useful skills that can even be used to create your own company.

This is a suitable option if you’re willing to take a couple of weeks or months to fully train yourself in a new field and get back to work as soon as possible.

This article was written by Access Training, one of the leading providers of vocational courses in the UK. For more information, visit: https://www.accesstraininguk.co.uk/contact-us

Training Top 125

2017 Training Top 125 winners demonstrated a strong focus on effective training and employee development tied to corporate strategic goals and business impact.

Digital Issue

Click above for Training Magazine's
current digital issue

Training Live + Online Certificate Programs

Now You Can Have Live Online Access to Training magazine's Most Popular Certificate Programs! Click here for more information.

Emerging Training Leaders

Emerging

Spectacular. Impressive. Dazzling.

Spring is—finally—in the air.

By Lorri Freifeld

ISA Directory

Twitter