The Dreaded Interview

Nearly 6 in 10 Americans would rather stay at a job they disliked than go out and interview for a new one, according to a study of 2,000 respondents conducted by OnePoll on behalf of MOO.

Nearly half of 2,000 Americans would rather stand in line at the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) for a full day than make a bad impression during a job interview, according to a study conducted by OnePoll on behalf of MOO. And nearly 6 in 10 would rather stay at a job they disliked than go out and interview for a new one.

Other survey highlights:

  • 4 in 10 respondents admitted to forgetting an interviewer’s name, and 34% have forgotten the company’s name.
  • 42% of respondents have yelled at an interviewer, and another 4 in 10 have left in tears.
  • Americans were much more likely to put pressure on a first impression in an interview than meeting their inlaws for the first time: 72% vs. 22%.
  • More than 7 in 10 respondents said they feel business cards are essential for interviews, and 65% said having them makes them feel more confident.
  • Nearly three-quarters of Americans agreed a handshake can make or break an interview—with 53% saying a firm handshake is a must-have.
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