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Best Practices: The Avatars Are Coming

By Neal Goodman, Ph.D.

Best Practices: The Crisis in the Global Leadership Pipeline

By Neal Goodman, Ph.D., President, Global Dynamics, Inc. Baby Boomers with global business expertise are retiring, and many organizations are hoping to replace them with talented Asian leaders to help them succeed in emerging markets in Asia. Yet few of the leadership programs in Asian universities are teaching skills such as vision, creativity, and risk-taking that are at the core of many organizations.

Best Practices: Confucius Meets Plato

By Neal Goodman, Ph.D.

Best Practices: T&D for Global JVs and M&As

By Neal Goodman, Ph.D. Between 50 and 70 percent of international joint ventures (IJVs) fail, yet the number of IJVs, mergers, and acquisitions continues to increase. It is estimated that companies are making a combined investment of upward of $500 billion a year in these high-risk/high-reward ventures. What must not be overlooked is the role Training and Development can play in increasing the likelihood that these ventures will be more rewarding and less risky. Here is one current example:

The (Frustrating) Quest for Gender Diversity

By Caroline Turner Although women have made much progress in reaching the leadership levels of business, the progress is disappointing—and stalled. What is so stubborn about this issue? Why aren’t more women making it to (and staying at) the top? The answer may be in becoming more aware of why women leave and of what they bring to the table.

Best Practices: Diversity Dimensions

By Neal Goodman, Ph.D., President, Global Dynamics, Inc.

An Untapped Talent Pool

By Margery Weinstein

Best Practices: After You Train, Retain

By Neal Goodman, Ph.D., President, Global Dynamics, Inc. All too often, companies invest in the professional development of their workforce only to lose that investment after employees leave (or when they simply forget what they learned). According to Ernst & Young, 44 percent of employees are “poor or very poor” at transferring knowledge.

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